Watching The Geese Grow

10 Jun

We have just had a week in Mid Wales with no rain!  Hard to believe I know and even the locals are scratching their heads trying to think if this has ever happened before.  A couple of days were coolish, on Thursday we had something like a high fog until mid afternoon then the sun broke through.  Until then it was quite chilly, but it did not rain. So we did spend some of our days this week just being around the property and enjoying it.

We got our chores done as usual on Monday morning and since it was such a lovely spring day we headed to Cardiff.  We did our usual routine and used the park and ride then spent a few hours walking about 8km around the city – Cardiff Bay, pedestrian precinct, Cardiff Castle, etc.  It was a very enjoyable day.

On Tuesday we did something completely out of left field – we went to the ewe sale at the Brecon Livestock Market.  I was hoping the place itself was going to have a bit of character and offer me some interesting photo opportunities.  There were some characters in attendance alright but the facility is relatively new so it is all concrete and galvanised pipework and under a corrugated iron roof which made the lighting extremely difficult.  But I tried.  The whole exercise was quite amusing.  Ideally I would like to have been invisible but in fact I could not have been more conspicuous.  There I was in clean clothes, not wearing a check patterned brushed cotton shirt, not wearing gumboots (wellingtons), not wearing drover’s pants and carrying a substantial camera.  Hmmmm.  Halfway through the auction the auctioneer stopped and told everyone to behave and smile nicely because there was a bloke with a camera!  Now everyone is looking at me and the banter and laughter interrupted affairs for a couple of minutes.  And I could not understand a word of it.  I couldn’t understand more than a few words from the auctioneer either due to the speed and accent combined.  Near the end of the auction there was another amusing moment.  One of the larger than life local identities who had been mixing up banter throughout the proceedings interrupted the auctioneer with, “Hey, that bloke down the end hasn’t bought anything yet!”  That had the place in fits for a few moments.  All in all a fun visit.  We also walked around the town of Brecon spending more time than planned at the Brecon Cathedral.   They were in the midst of a visit by a school group so there were 100 or so 10 to 12 year-olds working in groups.  It was good to see the place well used.  At home again we set up a section of netting so the three goslings could spend some time out on the grass.  What a time waster, sitting there watching their antics.  Hence the title of this week’s post.  We did also get Gwen, the border collie, up the hill for a little photo shoot and that was fun too.

Friday was another cracker day so we left home at 09h00 for a drive.  Leanne wanted to get me back to Hay-on-Wye in this better weather to see if I could avoid permanently relegating it to the unfortunate category of shit hole after our last visit.  It worked.  The place looks much more appealing on a sunny day and we even had one bar of cellphone reception!   We then drove through Talgarth and on to the Common area around Black Mountain where we chanced upon a gliding club so stopped and took photos.  In their hangar there was a large framed picture of an amazing cloud formation over some hills… Middlemarch, Otago, NZ.  Turned out that their chief gliding instructor spends the northern winter working as an instructor at Omarama.  Such a small world.  Next stop was Crickhowell.  Rather nice village with the usual ruined castle etc.  The general store was some family name followed by “& Sons & Daughters & Grandsons & Granddaughters”.  Took up most of the window!  We were home for lunch by 14h00 and then spent more time being amused by the geese, cats and dogs.

On Saturday it was time to get the laundry up to date, organise our stuff and start packing it back into the car.  I am writing this on Saturday afternoon.  Lisa is due home in a couple of hours.  Sunday sees us leaving Wern Fawr after a fun two weeks and heading firstly to Bristol to meet up with Leanne’s Mum & Dad.  After our time with them we will end next week on Islay so it is going to be busy.  With that in mind I am going to post this early with the idea of squaring everything up next week.  Enjoy the photos.

I believe these mountains near Brecon are the Black Mountains, not to be confused with Black Mountain (singular) about ten miles away.  Between the two lay the Brecon Beacons.

I believe these mountains near Brecon are the Black Mountains, not to be confused with Black Mountain (singular) about ten miles away. Between the two lay the Brecon Beacons.

Wales Millennium Centre is an arts centre located in the Cardiff Bay area of Cardiff. The site covers a total area of 4.7 acres (1.9 ha). The centre has hosted performances of opera, ballet, dance, comedy and musicals.  Locally nicknamed "the Armadillo", the Centre comprises one large theatre and two smaller halls with shops, bars and restaurants. It houses the national orchestra and opera, dance, theatre and literature companies, a total of eight arts organisations in residence. The main theatre, the Donald Gordon Theatre, has 1,897 seats, the BBC Hoddinott Hall 350 and the Weston Studio Theatre 250.

Wales Millennium Centre is an arts centre located in the Cardiff Bay area of Cardiff. The site covers a total area of 4.7 acres (1.9 ha). The centre has hosted performances of opera, ballet, dance, comedy and musicals.
Locally nicknamed “the Armadillo”, the Centre comprises one large theatre and two smaller halls with shops, bars and restaurants. It houses the national orchestra and opera, dance, theatre and literature companies, a total of eight arts organisations in residence. The main theatre, the Donald Gordon Theatre, has 1,897 seats, the BBC Hoddinott Hall 350 and the Weston Studio Theatre 250.

Wales Millennium Centre viewed from the pier.

Wales Millennium Centre viewed from the pier.

Detail of the terracotta work on The Pierhead Building.

Detail of the terracotta work on The Pierhead Building.

The Pierhead Building stands as one of the city of Cardiff's most familiar landmarks and was built in 1897 as the headquarters for the Bute Dock Company. The clock on the building is unofficially known as the "Baby Big Ben" or the "Big Ben of Wales", and also serves as a Welsh history museum. The Pierhead Building is part of the estate of the National Assembly for Wales, which also includes the Senedd and Ty Hywel. It was a replacement for the headquarters of the Bute Dock Company which burnt down in 1892. Frame's mentor was William Burges, with whom Frame worked on the rebuilding of Cardiff Castle and Castell Coch until Burges's death in 1881.

The Pierhead Building stands as one of the city of Cardiff’s most familiar landmarks and was built in 1897 as the headquarters for the Bute Dock Company. The clock on the building is unofficially known as the “Baby Big Ben” or the “Big Ben of Wales”, and also serves as a Welsh history museum. The Pierhead Building is part of the estate of the National Assembly for Wales, which also includes the Senedd and Ty Hywel. It was a replacement for the headquarters of the Bute Dock Company which burnt down in 1892. Frame’s mentor was William Burges, with whom Frame worked on the rebuilding of Cardiff Castle and Castell Coch until Burges’s death in 1881.

The Animal Wall was designed by William Burges in 1866, but it was not built until 1890, after Burges's death in 1881. The work of the restoration of Cardiff Castle and the building of the Animal Wall for the Marquess of Bute, was continued by his former assistant William Frame. The original nine animal figures were sculptured by Thomas Nicholls, they were the hyena, wolf, apes, seal, bear, lioness, lynx, and 2 different lions. They were painted in naturalistic colours, although since then the paint work on the sculptures has been removed.  The wall was moved about 50 metres (160 ft) from outside Cardiff Castle to its present location outside Bute Park in 1922, due to road widening in front of the castle in Duke Street and Castle Street (now the A4161).  In 1931 a further six animals were added; the pelican, ant-eater, raccoons, leopard, beaver and vulture.  They were all sculptured by Alexander Carrick.

The Animal Wall was designed by William Burges in 1866, but it was not built until 1890, after Burges’s death in 1881. The work of the restoration of Cardiff Castle and the building of the Animal Wall for the Marquess of Bute, was continued by his former assistant William Frame. The original nine animal figures were sculptured by Thomas Nicholls, they were the hyena, wolf, apes, seal, bear, lioness, lynx, and 2 different lions. They were painted in naturalistic colours, although since then the paint work on the sculptures has been removed. The wall was moved about 50 metres (160 ft) from outside Cardiff Castle to its present location outside Bute Park in 1922, due to road widening in front of the castle in Duke Street and Castle Street (now the A4161). In 1931 a further six animals were added; the pelican, ant-eater, raccoons, leopard, beaver and vulture. They were all sculptured by Alexander Carrick.

Cardiff Castle is a medieval castle and Victorian architecture Gothic revival mansion, transformed from a Norman keep erected over a Roman fort in the Castle Quarter of Cardiff. In 1947, the Bute South Wales estates having all been sold, the castle, and surrounding park, was gifted to the City of Cardiff by the fifth Marquis. It is now a popular tourist attraction, and houses a regimental museum in addition to the ruins of the old castle and the Victorian reconstruction. It sits in the expansive grounds of Bute Park.

Cardiff Castle is a medieval castle and Victorian architecture Gothic revival mansion, transformed from a Norman keep erected over a Roman fort in the Castle Quarter of Cardiff. In 1947, the Bute South Wales estates having all been sold, the castle, and surrounding park, was gifted to the City of Cardiff by the fifth Marquis. It is now a popular tourist attraction, and houses a regimental museum in addition to the ruins of the old castle and the Victorian reconstruction. It sits in the expansive grounds of Bute Park.

Another glimpse of Cardiff Castle taken over the animal wall.

Another glimpse of Cardiff Castle taken over the animal wall.

The new Cardiff Library with a sculpture in the foreground.

The new Cardiff Library with a sculpture in the foreground.

This was on Monday.  The goslings still had some of their down.

This was on Monday. The goslings still had some of their down.

Cliff was one of our neighbours at Wern Fawr.  He celebrated his 70th birthday last week but is still out working before 07h00 every day.  Very nice guy too!

Cliff was one of our neighbours at Wern Fawr. He celebrated his 70th birthday last week but is still out working before 07h00 every day. Very nice guy too!

This was the scene just after 09h00 at the ewe sale (because it was Tuesday) at the Brecon Livestock Market.

This was the scene just after 09h00 at the ewe sale (because it was Tuesday) at the Brecon Livestock Market.

The grounds of Christ College in Brecon looked so good as we walked by I just had to slip in for a better look.

The grounds of Christ College in Brecon looked so good as we walked by I just had to slip in for a better look.

Here is the man on his 10 year old, £40,000, five cutting head mower.  That's why Christ College in Brecon has such nice lawns.

Here is the man on his 10 year old, £40,000, five cutting head mower. That’s why Christ College in Brecon has such nice lawns.

I don't see many Reliant Robins around so I had to have this photo.  Mr Bean wasn't anywhere to be seen.

I don’t see many Reliant Robins around so I had to have this photo. Mr Bean wasn’t anywhere to be seen.

It seems that towns around here don't have a traditional town square - they have a town triangle.

It seems that towns around here don’t have a traditional town square – they have a town triangle.

Line of cottages in Brecon.

Line of cottages in Brecon.

Another streetscape in Brecon.

Another streetscape in Brecon.

Getting away from the main street in Brecon we came across this delightful scene.  To quote the local website… This landlocked canal runs for 35 miles (56km) from the old market town of Brecon to Five Locks, Cwmbran, following the scenic Usk Valley. It offers glorious views of the Brecon Beacons and passes through fascinating villages including Talybont-on-Usk, Llangynidr, Llangattock, Gilwern, Govilon and Llanfoist. Unlike many others, this canal has trees along much of its length, an array of wildflowers on its banks and is home to mallards, moorhens, carp and bream, kingfishers, herons, dragonflies and butterflies.  http://www.breconbeacons.org/visit-us/things-to-do-and-see/special-places-to-visit/monmouthshire-and-brecon-canal

Getting away from the main street in Brecon we came across this delightful scene. To quote the local website… This landlocked canal runs for 35 miles (56km) from the old market town of Brecon to Five Locks, Cwmbran, following the scenic Usk Valley. It offers glorious views of the Brecon Beacons and passes through fascinating villages including Talybont-on-Usk, Llangynidr, Llangattock, Gilwern, Govilon and Llanfoist. Unlike many others, this canal has trees along much of its length, an array of wildflowers on its banks and is home to mallards, moorhens, carp and bream, kingfishers, herons, dragonflies and butterflies. http://www.breconbeacons.org/visit-us/things-to-do-and-see/special-places-to-visit/monmouthshire-and-brecon-canal

A narrowboat in the terminus area of the Brecon Canal.

A narrowboat in the terminus area of the Brecon Canal.

Another steeetscape in Brecon.

Another steeetscape in Brecon.

A partial view of Brecon Cathedral.  To again quote… The Cathedral was, until the establishment of the Diocese of Swansea and Brecon in 1923, first the Benedictine Priory of St John the Evangelist, founded by the Normans in 1093, then the Parish Church of St John from 1538 at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries. It is highly likely that the Norman Priory was built on the site of a much older, possibly Celtic, church.   http://www.breconcathedral.org.uk

A partial view of Brecon Cathedral. To again quote… The Cathedral was, until the establishment of the Diocese of Swansea and Brecon in 1923, first the Benedictine Priory of St John the Evangelist, founded by the Normans in 1093, then the Parish Church of St John from 1538 at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries. It is highly likely that the Norman Priory was built on the site of a much older, possibly Celtic, church. http://www.breconcathedral.org.uk

Some more of Brecon Cathedral.

Some more of Brecon Cathedral.

This is just wrong!  A Toyota van with a Kombi front.  What were they thinking?!

This is just wrong! A Toyota van with a Kombi front. What were they thinking?!

Brecon Castle is mainly a hotel now and we could not see where the public could access it.

Brecon Castle is mainly a hotel now and we could not see where the public could access it.

This is the view from Lisa's place, Wern Fawr.  Just to emphasise how nice the weather has been during our stay.  This was at 14h41 on Tuesday.

This is the view from Lisa’s place, Wern Fawr. Just to emphasise how nice the weather has been during our stay. This was at 14h41 on Tuesday.

A shot of Gwen on the move.  You might notice the barn compost all over the ground behind her.  The two paddocks east of the house on Thursday last week.  Since then the breeze has been from the east!  Smelly indeed.  Thankfully with the dry conditions the smell subsided in a few days and we can still run the dogs without it getting stuck to us and them.

A shot of Gwen on the move. You might notice the barn compost all over the ground behind her. The two paddocks east of the house on Thursday last week. Since then the breeze has been from the east! Smelly indeed. Thankfully with the dry conditions the smell subsided in a few days and we can still run the dogs without it getting stuck to us and them.

Gwen's white side.

Gwen’s white side.

She is excitable!

She is excitable!

View of the house from part way up the hill.  Barn on the left, carport on the right with the glasshouse just visible.

View of the house from part way up the hill. Barn on the left, carport on the right with the glasshouse just visible.

There are two hens - a red one and a black one.  Guess which one this is?

There are two hens – a red one and a black one. Guess which one this is?

Martha coming in to view.

Martha coming in to view.

A rather scruffy looking Blue Tit.  A pair were nesting in the wall of the barn and using the digger as a perch.

A rather scruffy looking Blue Tit. A pair were nesting in the wall of the barn and using the digger as a perch.

This is Simba, the suspected bunny catcher from last week's post.

This is Simba, the suspected bunny catcher from last week’s post.

The clock tower at Hay-on-Wye, again, located on a triangle rather than square.

The clock tower at Hay-on-Wye, again, located on a triangle rather than square.

A streetscape in Hay-on-Wye.

A streetscape in Hay-on-Wye.

Scenery in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Scenery in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

The Brecon Beacons in the background.  (The camera was level - the landscape is sloping!)

The Brecon Beacons in the background. (The camera was level – the landscape is sloping!)

A punter about to take a trial flight at the Brecon Beacons Gliding Club.

A punter about to take a trial flight at the Brecon Beacons Gliding Club.

We have lift off!

We have lift off!

The Piper Pawnee tug plane pulling the K13 in to the air.

The Piper Pawnee tug plane pulling the K13 in to the air.

The Piper Pawnee passing over the field to drop the tow rope, which landed practically at the feet of the guy waiting for it.

The Piper Pawnee passing over the field to drop the tow rope, which landed practically at the feet of the guy waiting for it.

Piper Pawnee on landing.

Piper Pawnee on landing.

This house in Crickhowell had a pretty impressive front fence!

This house in Crickhowell had a pretty impressive front fence!

The main street of the market town of Crickhowell located on the River Usk, on the southern edge of the Black Mountains and in the eastern part of the Brecon Beacons National Park.

The main street of the market town of Crickhowell located on the River Usk, on the southern edge of the Black Mountains and in the eastern part of the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Crickhowell castle was initially a motte and bailey castle built from 1121.  It has a colourful history.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crickhowell

Crickhowell castle was initially a motte and bailey castle built from 1121. It has a colourful history. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crickhowell

We have started shutting the three young ones in the run once the others are out in the paddock.  It was nice an sunny so we put them in this water tub - they were not too sure about it and clambered out fairly quickly.

We have started shutting the three young ones in the run once the others are out in the paddock. It was nice an sunny so we put them in this water tub – they were not too sure about it and clambered out fairly quickly.

Friday evening at Wern Fawr.

Friday evening at Wern Fawr.

Saturday morning and we are invaded by John Jones!  There is no escape.

Saturday morning and we are invaded by John Jones! There is no escape.

 

 

 

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One Response to “Watching The Geese Grow”

  1. Lesley-Ann June 23, 2013 at 19:29 #

    Pleased to see that you are still enjoying yourselves. The garden here is looking amazing but no goslings, although we have a cheeky blackbird who raids the fruit bowl in the conservatory for cherries!

  2. Lucy June 10, 2013 at 22:12 #

    Not sure how I stumbled across your blog, but please get in touch if you have any of your goslings for sale!

    Many thanks

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