Digital Asset Management – Organising Photos

21 Oct

Most of what I spent my time on this week will not be the subject of curiosity for most but I will share some of it for those who might be interested.  The subject is DAM, or Digital Asset Management or in this case, organising my photos.  I use Apple’s Aperture application for managing and post processing my photos and have done for about three years.  All my photos in that time are filed according to a simple but robust method so I can generally find what I want.  Before that I had the usual folders all over the place, inconsistent naming, no ratings, usually no keywords, no geotagging and pretty much a mess.  And I imported all that chaos of photos and folders into Aperture at the start and put it all together in a folder called “Imported” while it waited for proper attention.  It amounted to about 25,000 photos (and some scanned prints) dating back to 1996.  I had always intended to tidy it up but it is not a job to be done piecemeal.  So when the weather turned a bit wet and kept us indoors at the start of this week I decided to tackle this long deferred job and get it all done as quickly as possible.  I had given the approach to it plenty of thought over a long period so I knew exactly how I would go about it without it all collapsing into a total mess.  Still, it took about 30 hours over three days to get it sorted.  Photos from different events are now all in separate, dated and appropriately named projects, keywords have been rationalised and hierarchically structured, many more people’s names have been added, some geotagging is done and lots of duplicates have been eliminated.  Now my entire photo library is structured consistently and ready for the long haul.  And finding things is a breeze.  It was a lot of work but I think it will be worth it.  Many of the photos are not great shots but they do represent important memories with family and friends and as such they can’t be re-acquired.  Hence the need to properly organise them so they can be retrieved at will (I already have a robust backup system in place).

Following up on a loose end from the last post, Leanne did find me some information on the Michelin Plaques.  The information comes from a French website here, and is very badly translated automatically by Google.  So it must be read with a certain flexibility of interpretation!  Anyway…

With the rise of the automobile, and travels more “distant”, the question arises to move in space, and with the greatest possible safety …

The villages are not then listed. We must seek help on the road at every intersection … André Michelin then finds the idea of ​​plates showing the name of the common passage, on which it is often proposed to slow down from the safety of children, accompanied the words “thank you.”  

After World War I, he developed this idea by grouping posts all useful information. It uses plates enamelled lava, very durable and resistant to weathering, mounted on concrete supports.

The idea is so good and makes such services it is validated by the administration in 1931. It is then added traffic directions, priorities and other recommendations. All with Michelin advertising placed on the panel.

In 1946, a policy statement puts some order in all this by standardizing the information on the signs, and banning all donations panels, let alone with an indication of sponsor …

However, Michelin continues to provide panels, taking advantage of his knowledge, but by selling them to the administration.

In 1971, Michelin completely ceases to manufacture these panels enamelled lava.

On Thursday the weather was looking quite nice and we went to Poitiers, less than an hour away.  As usual there is more history than my little brain can absorb in one sitting so I resorted to taking photos as normal.  We only looked closely at a couple of the many monumental buildings but they both had very detailed and fine stone carving.  They were Église Notre-Dame la Grande and Cathédrale Saint-Pierre.

Cathédrale Saint-Pierre in Poitiers was about 800 years in the making and has beautiful carved stone arches.

Cathédrale Saint-Pierre in Poitiers was about 800 years in the making and has beautiful carved stone arches.

More detail of the central carving depicting judgement day.

More detail of the central carving depicting judgement day.

This is in the centre of Poitiers and proves that there are still people in France!  It was noticed that last week's photos in particular did not include any with people in until the last three specifically of Leanne.

This is in the centre of Poitiers and proves that there are still people in France! It was noticed that last week’s photos in particular did not include any with people in until the last three specifically of Leanne.

Église Notre-Dame la Grande basking in the afternoon sun.

Église Notre-Dame la Grande basking in the afternoon sun.

Again I managed to allow people into my photo, this time of the front of Église Notre-Dame la Grande.

Again I managed to allow people into my photo, this time of the front of Église Notre-Dame la Grande.

Like St Peter's Cathedral, Église Notre-Dame la Grande was adorned with fine stone carving depicting biblical scenes.

Like St Peter’s Cathedral, Église Notre-Dame la Grande was adorned with fine stone carving depicting biblical scenes.

Église Notre-Dame la Grande showing the story of Adam & Eve on the left and in the centre are the prophets holding scrolls with their prophecies for the life of Jesus. Of course I didn't know this but someone whose image was returned by Google Images did seem to know.

Église Notre-Dame la Grande showing the story of Adam & Eve on the left and in the centre are the prophets holding scrolls with their prophecies for the life of Jesus. Of course I didn’t know this but someone whose image was returned by Google Images did seem to know.

The interior of Église Notre-Dame la Grande was very dark so not a very clear photo I am afraid.  The painting is a 19th century embellishment.

The interior of Église Notre-Dame la Grande was very dark so not a very clear photo I am afraid. The painting is a 19th century embellishment.

The Town Hall, on a different and altogether grander square with lots of open space.

The Town Hall, on a different and altogether grander square with lots of open space.

Our other outing for this week was to Île d’Oléron on the coast of this area of central western France.  By the time we got to the coast it was a brilliant day and I for one was definitely overdressed.

Porte des Salines is on Île d'Oléron.  We had been given a rave review for this little restaurant which occupied some converted fishermen's sheds on the jetty.  In spite of the sign on the gable saying "OUVERT" it was firmly closed and would be until March 2014.

Porte des Salines is on Île d’Oléron. We had been given a rave review for this little restaurant which occupied some converted fishermen’s sheds on the jetty. In spite of the sign on the gable saying “OUVERT” it was firmly closed and would be until March 2014.

So we headed a little further along the south side of the Île d'Oléron to a lookout and beach access point.

So we headed a little further along the south side of the Île d’Oléron to a lookout and beach access point.

Looking approximately south down the beach.  Probably heaving in the summer but nice and peaceful in mid-October.

Looking approximately south down the beach. Probably heaving in the summer but nice and peaceful in mid-October.

Bleeding shadow...

Bleeding shadow…

The view to the north-west and into the Atlantic.

The view to the north-west and into the Atlantic.

And another one for good measure.  Soon we will be dreaming of weather like this so for now we enjoy.

And another one for good measure. Soon we will be dreaming of weather like this so for now we enjoy.

"WC on the floor for customers" - really?!?  This was in the café where we had lunch at Château d'Oléron.  It is an example of how badly wrong Google Translate can be!

“WC on the floor for customers” – really?!? This was in the café where we had lunch at Château d’Oléron. It is an example of how badly wrong Google Translate can be!

The harbour at Château d'Oléron is flanked by a rather large citadel. An historic photo shows the entire area in flames in 1945.

The harbour at Château d’Oléron is flanked by a rather large citadel. An historic photo shows the entire area in flames in 1945.

Here’s a thought… Standing on the top of the Citadel wall with nothing between us and a 25m drop onto rocks and certain death we both realised the tremendous value in not having life insurance.  Neither of us had any incentive to push the other off.  Life is good!

Inside the citadel the arsenal has been restored and the grounds seemed to be in use by a school group doing sport.

Inside the citadel the arsenal has been restored and the grounds seemed to be in use by a school group doing sport.

Looking across the small harbour to the citadel.

Looking across the small harbour to the citadel.

I have discovered where all the paint companies send the colours that didn't sell in the last season.

I have discovered where all the paint companies send the colours that didn’t sell in the last season.

Joined at the hip.

Joined at the hip.

Some of these colourful buildings seemed to be retailers or summer equipment hire places.

Some of these colourful buildings seemed to be retailers or summer equipment hire places.

Others you just couldn't tell.

Others you just couldn’t tell.

And my sad story for the week – I broke my phone.  Life was not so good on this day.

This is what happens when you leave your iPhone on the duvet then in the process of searching for it you knock it on to the floor.  The fall was 50cm on to a wooden surface.  I didn't even see it go, I just heard it clatter and when I retrieved it this was the result.  So that means a two hour trip to Nantes to visit the nearest Apple Store where they will relieve me of €200 to €300 to replace the screen.  Bugger!  It does still work though and the screen protector is holding all the shards of glass in place for the moment.

This is what happens when you leave your iPhone on the duvet then in the process of searching for it you knock it on to the floor. The fall was 50cm on to a wooden surface. I didn’t even see it go, I just heard it clatter and when I retrieved it this was the result. So that means a two hour trip to Nantes to visit the nearest Apple Store where they will relieve me of €200 to €300 to replace the screen. Bugger! It does still work though and the screen protector is holding all the shards of glass in place for the moment.

Until next week when I am sure to have some ugly stories about getting my phone repaired.  I am not looking forward to it.

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